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King EAM View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Feb 2011 at 16:42
Originally posted by The_Dude The_Dude wrote:

Well now I am very curious!  Any chance you could mail me your research results, Hora?  Thanks.


TD has the most posts now! Clap (Sorry HM)


Edited by King EAM - 05 Feb 2011 at 16:45
"It's hard to know until you're a Crow"
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Feb 2011 at 17:25
aw...

Google Translate guesses by default that hora is Spanish and means 'time'.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Feb 2011 at 17:31
Let us just say that 'Hora' is a common dialect word for a specific person belonging to the second oldest profession in the world.
Postatem obscuri lateris nescitis
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Feb 2011 at 19:59
Originally posted by Hora Hora wrote:

...  that was the one meaning definitly not meant with my name!

Yes I figured, I hope u didn't mind me telling.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Feb 2011 at 20:46
Originally posted by The_Dude The_Dude wrote:

Well now I am very curious!  Any chance you could mail me your research results, Hora?  Thanks.


hmm...grr...
before I have to mail everybody on it, I'll just tell evryone  Wacko

Thanks to Strategos and MrAndersson I learned Scandinavian now LOL
"Hora" seems to mean a 'more kind' form of discribing a whore in swedish, which changes to "hore" in norwegian, and that's where Strategos fell over it.
Originally I had it from a book, where it was because of the latin meaning of "hour", and later I discovered the czech meaning of "mountain"

Hope evryone now knows it, and thus that matter is solved Clap

... /me thinks it would be an idea to move (or even remove?) this last part, as it really has no relation to the tournament, has it? Wink

mfg Hora
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Feb 2011 at 20:51
hey cool, in Suaheli "hora"  means "to hear" Geek

in serbia it means "choir"

what a strange wor(l)d LOL


Edited by Hora - 05 Feb 2011 at 20:57
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Feb 2011 at 02:16
Originally posted by Hora Hora wrote:

hey cool, in Suaheli "hora"  means "to hear" Geek

in serbia it means "choir"

what a strange wor(l)d LOL


Without wanting to go into one of my long preset speeches on Etymology which can and will send everyone to sleep... 

The two main usages mentioned so far are actually the same.

Pretty much all western languages are descended from Sanskrit, on either side of the Centum-Satum Isogloss.

Hora is, as far back as etymologists can trace, a Sanskrit word taken from the root ahoratram meaning "day and night".  Hora, in the Sanskrit, pretty much means "time", but was mostly used in the context of night-time; and in modern usage tends to refer to "Astrology".

And so, yes there is an obvious linguistic connection between Hora and Hour simply because hours are the elements that make up day and night (ie time).

Equally pertinently, the "other" modern root to which everyone is obliquely referring is similar rooted.

Hora in the Latin (actually borrowed by Latin from the Greek and so on back to the Sanskrit) being feminine (ending in -a) therefore has connections to "Woman of the Night".  I think you see where this is headed, and how we ended up with the word everyone's avoiding. 

Same root.

As it were.

/me goes to bed

[EDIT Addendum for completeness sake:  There's an alternate theory that the "we shall not speak of" usage of the word that we spell with a "w" in English actually comes from the PIE root qar (which gave us the Latin for "carus" (dear) etc) via Proto-Germanic; but I've generally been unconvinced by that explanation; given that phrases such as "Woman of the Night" and/or "by the hour" persist to this day.  The truth might lie somewhere inbetween in the linguistic equivalent of a mashup.]



Edited by GM Stormcrow - 06 Feb 2011 at 02:32
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Feb 2011 at 02:33
Originally posted by GM Stormcrow GM Stormcrow wrote:

Originally posted by Hora Hora wrote:

hey cool, in Suaheli "hora"  means "to hear" Geek
in serbia it means "choir"
what a strange wor(l)d LOL

Without wanting to go into one of my long preset speeches on Etymology which can and will send everyone to sleep... 
The two main usages mentioned so far are actually the same.
Pretty much all western languages are descended from Sanskrit, on either side of the Centum-Satum Isogloss.
Hora is, as far back as etymologists can trace, a Sanskrit word taken from the root ahoratram meaning "day and night".  Hora, in the Sanskrit, pretty much means "time", but was mostly used in the context of night-time; and in modern usage tends to refer to "Astrology".
And so, yes there is an obvious linguistic connection between Hora and Hour simply because hours are the elements that make up day and night (ie time).
Equally pertinently, the "other" modern root to which everyone is obliquely referring is similar rooted.
Hora in the Latin (actually borrowed by Latin from the Greek and so on back to the Sanskrit) being feminine (ending in -a) therefore has connections to "Woman of the Night".  I think you see where this is headed, and how we ended up with the word everyone's avoiding. 
Same root.
As it were.
/me goes to bed
[EDIT Addendum for completeness sake:  There's an alternate theory that the "we shall not speak of" usage of the word that we spell with a "w" in English actually comes from the PIE root qar (which gave us the Latin for "carus" (dear) etc) via Proto-Germanic; but I've generally been unconvinced by that explanation; given that phrases such as "Woman of the Night" and/or "by the hour" persist to this day.  The truth might lie somewhere inbetween in the linguistic equivalent of a mashup.]

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Feb 2011 at 02:35
As a slight (though not quite as impressive) addendum to Stormcrow, I can say that "to hear" is "høre" in Norwegian.

And for those unfamiliar with the rather unique scandinavian letters, ø and o are as different as p and q (or a and å ;) )


Edited by Strategos - 06 Feb 2011 at 02:37
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Feb 2011 at 02:37
Originally posted by Llyorn Of Jaensch Llyorn Of Jaensch wrote:


Sleepy


Doh!

Ah well, I should probably move these posts out of this thread - luckily there's a "naming" thread in the Caravanserai that's pretty sleepy as well Wink

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